Category Archives: Nature

May 2016 – San Francisco Hot Springs

Pamela Morgan and I met when I was a Realtor and I helped her find a home. We’ve hiked many times before so when she contacted me recently, I was happy to get back on a trail with her.   Catching up with Pamela included hearing about her three week trip to Thailand and riding an elephant, comparing notes on elderly parents, hearing about her new venture offering Stress Management (more on that later), and her K9 work with Grant County Search and Rescue (GCSAR).

The whole day was full of interesting conversation but the K9 training had me especially fascinated. Trained dogs aid searches by helping to determine the direction of travel of the lost subject which narrows the search field dramatically. The GCSAR K9 unit currently has four handlers and 6 dogs that train weekly. While on our hike, we tested Pamela’s dog, Riley. I walked ahead for several minutes and hid. I watched through the bushes as he came off the main trail at the exact point where I did, went directly to the first bush I stopped behind and then continued quickly to my hiding spot. We performed this exercise twice in two different areas and he easily found me both times. It was amazing to watch.

As hikers, we’ve all heard stories about searches. If you get in a jam, it’s a relief to know that our area has a search team that’s well trained and willing to help. They are currently looking for members so if you have a desire to help others, like to play with gadgets, want to see some beautiful country, want to meet and work with great people, then GCSAR is something to consider joining.

Pamela told me about some of the trainings which sounded pretty cool. The topics include: navigation, virtual battleship, night training, lost person behavior, wildlife dangers, survival training, tech tool training, and lots more.

If you’re interested in joining, visit: http://www.gcsar-nm.org/join.htm, or come to their next meeting on June 16at 6:30 at the Gila Regional Medical Center’s EMS building on 32nd Street.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Here is an interesting hike to consider:

Name:  San Francisco Hot Springs

Distance: Variable

Difficulty: Moderate

Directions: Drive 180 north until you are between mile marker 57 and 56. Turn left onto County Road 025. Take this a short distance until you see the trailhead. There is a bathroom and Forest Service Information Board at the trailhead.

Hike Description: This trail is hilly until you reach the canyon area. Take the steep trail to the bottom of the canyon. From there, go to the left either by crossing the river and bushwhacking to the left or, before crossing the river, find the trail on your left and take that. Walk for 5-10 minutes. The hot springs are on the far side of the river, right against the river bank. With a little searching, we found them. Please note: your feet will get wet. Prepare accordingly.

Interesting geology surrounds hot springs. The water is heated by molten rock and raises to the surface through cracks. The warm water allows algae and bacteria to thrive. I was tickled that I could simultaneously put one hand in the cold river and the other in a warm spring.

Tell me about your new venture: Along our walk, Pamela told me about her new business, “Willowleaf Stress Management” that helps people manage the stress in their lives. In the coming months she will be growing her business and sharing her knowledge with the public. If you’d like to talk to her about this service, check out her website at: http://www.willowleafsm.com/ or contact her at 534-1395.

April 2016 – CD Trail North from FR 506

So I say to myself, “I need to hike with some young people.” Then I say to myself, “Self, you don’t know that many young people. Oh wait, I rent to a bunch of college students, maybe a couple of them would hike with me.” And that’s how I got lucky one Sunday morning to hike with Micaela Medina and Sage Mays.

Twenty-four year old Mica originally came to Silver City on a basketball scholarship at WNMU. After playing for one year, she got injured and wound up coaching for two years. Now a WNMU alumni, she currently teaches special education at Central Elementary and coaches Basketball at Cobre High School.

Mica and Sage became friends in Albuquerque and came to Silver City together for college. Sage, a 23 year old bilingual woman who’s mother’s family is from El Salvador, is currently a student at WNMU, president of Mustang Entertainment and works at the physical plant at the university. She is majoring in Occupational Therapy and plans to graduate in 2017.

When I asked her why she chose her major, she replied, “I chose my major because I love the field of medicine and I’ve always wanted to make a difference in the world and this is my way of doing that. I tend to do some volunteer work and see where my career takes me.”

Both work out regularly; they also regularly play basketball with friends. Mica sometimes works out in an empty classroom after school with several co-workers. They set up a boxing/cardio video and get their work-out that way. There is also a weight loss challenge happening at the school where teachers and administrative staff have the nurse log in changes.

They are both fine examples of what every young adult should be and if there are more like them out there, our country is going to be just fine. Although a passing comment about how “McDonald’s is so crowded at 3:00a.m.” had me reminiscing about my college days………….

Since Mica and Sage don’t do a lot of hiking here in the area (what?!?), I took them on a hike I really enjoy south of town.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Hike Description:

Name:  CD Trail – Highway 90 South

Distance:  variable

Difficulty: moderate

Directions: Starting at the intersection of Highway 90 and Broadway, drive south on Highway 90 for 19.8 miles. You will see a brown sign that says “Continental Divide Trail” with an arrow pointing right. Turn in to the parking area and drive to the far (south) side of the parking loop. You will see a CD Trail marker. Park nearby.

Hike Description: This hike will take you up the side of a mountain and is steep in spots. There is sand and loose rock. There are lots of opportunity to enjoy long range views.

Notes:  1) You may consider playing amongst the large boulders along the way.2) Also, as you drive through the parking lot you will notice several other hiking trails to explore.

About the Continental Divide Trail:

You may have noticed more hikers in town lately. April is when many of the CD Trail thru hikers begin their challenge. They restock and rest in Silver City before heading north and entering the Gila. April 15-17 was the Continental Divide Trail Coalition Trail Days events so you surely noticed the activity downtown that weekend! I most often notice the thru-hikers as they start walking up Alabama S. towards the CD Trail access point off of Bear Mountain Rd.

Some CD Trail Facts:

-The 3100 mile trail was established in 1978.

-There are 770 miles of Continental Divide Trail in New Mexico.

-Annually, approximately 150 people attempt to complete an end-to-end trail in one stretch.

-In order to complete it, you would have to hike an average of 17 miles a day (every day for about 6 months).

 

January 2016 – Nature Conservancy Land – Mimbres

Marilyn Markel – Nature Conservancy Land – Mimbres

If you want to meet fascinating people, I suggest that you start hiking and writing articles. Once again I got lucky and heard about this interesting woman who is an archeologist, is involved with the Mattocks Ruins in the Mimbres and who agreed to hike with me. Marilyn Markel is a native New Mexican who graduated from The University of New Mexico and currently keeps busy with The Mimbres Culture Heritage Site – Mattocks Ruins (MCHS), teaches at Aldo Leopold once a week, facilitates with the WILL Program, and is president of the Grant County Archaeological Society.

We hiked recently at the Nature Conservancy’s Mimbres land which is 600 acres of riparian delight. The property, which was established as Nature Conservancy land in 1994, includes 5 miles of Mimbres River and is home to the endangered Chihuahua chub (fish) and the Chiricahua leopard frog.

It has a diverse landscape including forest, savanna, grasslands, cienegas (marshes), springs and stream. It’s a beautiful place, even in the winter, so lace up those boots!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

Hike Name:  The Nature Conservancy – Mimbres Valley

Distance:  2+ miles

Difficulty: easy, but wet

Directions: From the intersection of 180 and 152, turn North onto Highway 152 north and drive 14 miles to Highway 35. Make a left onto Highway 35 north and drive for approximately 8.5 miles. There will be a steep, rutted driveway on the right. Pull in the driveway and park. If you pass 3448 Highway 35, you just missed it.

Hike Description: Start the hike by walking through the gate on the left. It is facing the barn, which dates to the 1890’s. Follow the path to the river. When you pass by the old saw, stop for a moment and realize that this saw probably cut the wood for the barn you parked near. Cross the river and maneuver (no trail visible here) through the trees and then the field until you pick up the old military road at the base of the hills. Walk on the road for the remainder of the hike.

Notes: 

Come to terms with the fact that you’re feet are going to get wet on this hike and prepare ahead. I suggest you place dry socks and shoes in your vehicle. Marilyn was smarter than me and brought old shoes in her backpack and changed before we entered the water.

The word ‘Mimbres’ means ‘willow’ in Spanish and I saw a few desert willows still sporting green leaves while we were there.

Before our hike, Marilyn gave me a tour of the Mimbres Culture Heritage Site.

The site, which is owned by the Imogene F. Wilson Education Foundation, contains a 1000 year old, 200 room Mimbres pueblo ruin which was built on top of an earlier pit house village. It is estimated that approximately 90 people lived here.

The property also contains 2 adobe buildings dating from the 1880’s which have their own interesting history including murder, insanity, and jail escapes. Over time, the site has been improved and now includes a small museum and a walking path with interpretive sign boards explaining the ruin layout and lives of the people who resided there. The museum resides in one of the adobe buildings, called the Gooch House. In addition to local Native American history, the museum also contains more recent history including mining and ranching in the area. Be sure to spend a few minutes looking at the photos from the early 1900’s.

It’s a great site for learning about Native Americans. Beloit College in Wisconsin, The University of Nevada – LV, The University of Texas, and Oregon State University have either  conducted summer field schools where pottery and other artifacts have been excavated at the site or, they used MCHS as a base camp when they were working at other sites in the Valley. Local grade school kids come to learn the history and are encouraged to imagine how life was 1000 years ago. I really like that there are pottery sherds in the museum for the kids to inspect and touch.

If you go out to the Mimbres, plan to stop at the MCHS and check it out. It is open from 11:00-3:00 on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays. It is located between mile marker 3 and 4 on Highway 35, just past the Mimbres Café, approximately 5 miles south of the Nature Conservancy property.

Do you have any suggestions for visitors to the ruins?

“It’s important for visitors to leave artifacts where they belong. As soon as it’s moved or removed, the information that goes with them is lost.”

November 2015 – Georgetown Road – FR 4085I

I have been hiking with Dora Hosler since we met in 2011. I love her story of coming to the United States because it is millions of immigrants’ story.  She was raised in a small village two hours from Chihuahua City, Mexico where she and her siblings spent the mornings in school and the afternoons milking cows, feeding chickens and pigs, and playing.

After begging her parents to let her come, she moved to Silver City with a cousin and got a job. She has worked at various jobs in Silver City, a place that she loves for its’ small town flavor, friendly people and because “it feels like home”.  In 2008 she achieved a hard-won goal of becoming a U.S. citizen. She is an especially pleasant and kind woman, and a strong, easy-going hiker.

I remember one hike when I tried to help her pronounce the ‘Z’ sound and I couldn’t understand her difficulty until she tried to teach me to roll my R’s and she didn’t understand how I couldn’t do it. The wildlife in the area must have been rolling with laughter listening to us.

When I recently asked her which of our many hikes her favorite was, she replied that she really enjoyed climbing to the top of Signal Peak because she was proud to complete a steep, difficult hike which that one certainly is. I call it the ‘knee-buster’ because afterwards, I limped for three days! She also enjoyed climbing the Forest Fire Tower and talking with the lookout on duty who was kind enough to give us a 360 degree tour of our hiking terrain, and explain how the alidade (fire finder) works.

For this article, we drove out to the mining district and hiked in the Georgetown area. It’s a good hike if you’re short on time but still want to get some soil underfoot.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Name:  Georgetown Road – FR 4085I

Distance:  various

Difficulty: easy

Directions: Starting at the intersection of Hwy. 90 and Hwy. 180, take Hwy. 180 East to Hwy. 152 (7.3 miles). Turn left (north) onto Hwy. 152 and drive 6.3 miles to Georgetown Road. Turn left on Georgetown Road (a very well-maintained dirt road). Take this 3.9 miles to an intersection where the cemetery is. Make a right and immediately you will see FR 4085I. Park on the right.

Hike Description: This is an easy walk along Lampbright Draw. The road may disappear now and then, but is easily picked up again. Look closely to find evidence of this area’s history, primarily mining and ranching. Once you walk past the corrals and windmill (approximately ¾ of a mile), the road is harder to find. We walked along an arroyo to complete our days’ exercise.

A little about the town of Georgetown:  The town grew out of silver mining in the area in the 1870’s and at its peak, had 1200 residents. Imagine churches, schools and adobe brick homes on the north side of town, a business district in the center with general stores, a butcher shop, a harness shop, restaurants, a hotel, a billiard parlor, and more, and then on the south side were miner’s shanties, saloons and ‘bawdy houses’. Military from surrounding forts would periodically be seen to keep the town safe from Apache attacks.

There’s some discrepancy about how the town got its’ name. The Magruder Brothers were mining here and they had come from Georgetown, Washington DC so that is one theory. But George Magruder was killed in a milling accident on the Mimbres River so some believe that the remaining brother named the town for his brother George.

Enjoy hiking in the area and contemplating how life may have been a short 140 years ago. For more details about the Georgetown area, check out my blog post:

https://100hikesinayear.wordpress.com/?s=Georgetown

Fun fact: oro in Spanish is gold; plata is silver; cobre in copper. I’m embarrassed to say that I’ve lived here 15 years and didn’t know that until recently………

This article was originally published in: “The Independent” on November 26, 2015.

July 2015 – Noonday Canyon

Beat the heat!

It was time to get some dirt trapped in my treads, so who better to call than the guy who came up with the name of this column (Trail Mix). Steve White, a friend, hiking buddy and past co-worker, was the guy who made the office fun to be in. Not all offices were lucky enough to have such a guy, but we sure were!

Steve has been hiking for years and had a few interesting memories to share. A few years ago when he and a companion were hiking towards Hillsboro Peak, they heard a weak call; “help!” Scurrying down the steep embankment, they found a man collapsed in a heap. With some effort, they were able to get him on the trail and provide aid. After witnessing the Gila hiker heave up a fair amount of red wine, they realized that he would not be able to get back to his vehicle on his own. They half carried, half guided him back. Steve later learned that the man, who was from the T or C area, had recently changed blood pressure medications and fainted while alone on the trail.

Steve also told me about a recent backpacking trip that he really enjoyed. He and a few friends spent three days in the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness area just west of Safford, Arizona. He described awesome canyon walls, pristine flowing water, and widely varying geology and vegetation.

He explained the beauty of the canyon like this: “one side of the canyon was mostly granite and had pockets that had been gouged out by boulders and runoff. These pockets were filled with water when we explored it, and from above they glinted like jewels. We also found a number of “hanging gardens” where ground water would seep in through the canyon walls. That portion of the canyon is relatively narrow with the walls rising to around 300′. Looking up from the bottom you can see saguaro cacti along the top of the mesas; there is also one place where an incredibly thick stand of giant saguaros runs all the way from mesa top to water’s edge-one of my more impressive views.”

OK, reader, I know you’re stuffing your backpack and ready to check it out. But go online and get a permit because they only issue 50 permits per day. Their website is: http://www.blm.gov/az/st/en/arolrsmain/aravaipa.html. I suggest you take the below hike while you wait.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

Name: Noonday Canyon

Distance: 4+

Difficulty: easy to moderate

Directions: Take 180 to Highway 152. Drive just under 24 miles on Highway 152. You will see brown highway signs indicating hiking trails 747 and 795. On the left you will see a dirt road (if you pass the “MM24” marker, turn around, you just missed it) with a brown marker noting FR 4087B. Pull down into this road, bear to the left and park. Down to the left you will see a wood sign on a tree indicating the start of Trail 747 going towards Rabb Park.

Hike Description: Spray on some bug repellent and begin your hike. For the first minute or two, you will be walking on an old dirt road which runs into the creek for a minute or two. Then you’re back onto the road. At the .7 mile mark (about 10-15 minutes), you will enter a clearing with a few downed logs, a campsite and such. If you look to the left, you will see a brown wood sign guiding you to the Rabb Park trail. Make a note to go back in cooler weather and investigate, and now look to the right of the main road where you will cross the creek and find another dirt road. This road will take you past an inhabited cabin. Please respect people’s privacy and don’t disturb any belongings. Continue walking along the road or trail, which may be challenging to find at some points. We were able to walk along Noonday Canyon with trail or road most of the way. When you’re exactly half way finished, turn around and return the way you came.

Notes: Be aware that there may be water running if it’s rained recently. Also keep an eye on possible rain clouds building to avoid being caught in rain or flooding.

There’s a sign at the trail head that warns of blocked and eroded trails and downed trees. We didn’t encounter any such problems along the way. We did walk through some burn areas where several dead standing trees looked like they could come down eminently.

About Noonday Canyon: There are apparently two Noonday Canyon’s – one in San Lorenzo, and this one which is off of Highway 152. I was curious about how it got its’ name and so after a visit to the library, I found some information. According to T.M. Pearce, when the mining boom was taking place in Pinos Altos and Kingston, people travelling between the camps always tried to reach this reliable water source by noon.

 

 

Note: This article first appeared in “The Independent” on July 23, 2015

June 2015 – FR880 – Sheep Corral Canyon Rd.

There are many ways to enjoy the outdoors in our area, and for the treasure hunter in all of us, geocaching is a fun option.

At the basic level, Geocaching is an activity where items (sometimes a log book, sometimes a small toy) are hidden by one party, logged onto the website, and then can be found by other parties. Anyone who has delighted in finding Easter eggs in the backyard will enjoy this game.

This month, the hike involves finding 5 caches along the route. You can either go to the website and get the information (Serina and Chad have put in clever descriptions and clues), or you can follow my directions in the hike description below.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

To get started, go to the website (www.geocaching.com/map ) and move the map so you can see north of Signal Peak and Scott Peak. Near the label called, “Slack Sawmill Tank”, you will see five caches. These are the items you’ll be trying to find on your hike. Click on the first cache, “H” Marks the Spot” and when the information window opens, click on the title (“H” Marks the Spot) and read the description for clues of where the cache is hidden. You can either write the clues down or use a GPS to find the items. Click on the other caches and note the clues. There is an app that can be downloaded onto your Smartphone, but be careful, there’s no connection in the remote areas.

Geocache Hike Description:

Name: Forest Road 880 – Sheep Corral Canyon Road

Distance: 2.0 roundtrip (or more…….)

Difficulty: easy to moderate

Directions: Starting at the intersection of Highway 15 and 32nd Street, drive 15.9 miles north on Highway 15 (a.k.a Pinos Altos Rd., a.k.a. P.A. Rd.). On the left is Sheep Corral Canyon Rd. There is a brown highway sign to show you where it is. Drive up this dirt road. At the 1.1 mile mark, pull over and park.

Hike Description: There is an old dirt road leading up hill. The brown Forest Road sign (882) was lying on the ground when we were there. Head up the hill. After walking 0.2 miles you will come to Forest Road 880. Don’t take the first side road, walk to the top of the hill and see a second road. Follow this road a short distance to the first cache. Here is the clue to find the cache: Go to the southwest side of where “H” marks the spot and walk 120 feet in a southwest direction where you will find a large pile of rocks and boulders. You are looking for a container with a log and a few toys in it. It is customary that if you take an item, you also leave an item, so you might consider bringing a toy or similar type object (but you don’t have to).Write your information in the log and return the container to its original hiding spot.

Go back the way you came and continue on the main road for a minute or so. Look on your right for cache #2. Here’s your clue: “A step above”. You will find a container hidden near the clue.

Now continue towards cache #3. At the .6 mile mark, your clue is: “Gila Hallow”. Before heading down the hill, look on your right for a hallow tree trunk. If you look carefully, you will find your next treasure.

You will now continue downhill (careful, there’s a lot of loose rock here) and at the .77 mile mark, your clue for cache #4 is “Rooty” (on the left). When you find this nice sized green box, why not take a photograph to share on the geocaching website later?

And now continue downhill to the .9 mile mark and find your last cache. The clue is “Y”. Here, on the left, you find the tree in question. To find the cache, follow a downed tree trunk to the fortune.

You have now found all the caches for this hike. But I encourage you to continue on the old road for a beautiful hike through the pines.

After the hike, go to the website and log your “finds”. You can also add photos showing you and your friends at the location.

Notes: (1) Please do not remove caches. (2) To learn more about this game (I only scratched the surface here), you can go to the website and read “Geocaching 101”.

About my guides: During our time hiking, I learned more about my Geocache guides. Since winning the Girl Scout Gold Award and meeting President Obama for her work in literacy (www.readforjoy.org), Serina has kept herself busy. She is currently on the Executive Board of the Girl Scouts of the Desert Southwest, has Served as Post-Secondary National President and member of Business Professionals of America, just ended two terms as Lieutenant Governor of Southwest District of Circle K International, is going to college at WNMU, is a world champion horsewoman and still has time to hide and find geocaches!

“Chad Paavola is equally impressive. He served 8 years in the Army, spending 5 years in Germany and was also stationed in Fort Myer, Virginia. He loves to travel the world and even scuba dives. He currently teaches at the Law Enforcement Academy at WNMU and is pursuing his masters degree in Elementary Education. This couple enjoys geocaching so much that when they’re on vacation, they fit geocaching into their travels. What a fun way to explore the world!

This article first appeared in the June 25, 2015 “The Independent” in my column, “Trail Mix”.  http://silvercitydailypress.nm.newsmemory.com/

April 2015 – FR 858/CD Trail/Silver Spur Loop

On a recent hike with Shelby Hallmark and Bob Wilson, I learned about the RTCA (Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance) and Grant County Trails Group, both which share a love for trails and their development in Grant County.

The RTCA group has been working on building support for developing Silver City’s planned trail system (notably the Master Greenways and Big Ditch Plan) and connecting it to the surrounding trails in the Gila National Forest. They applied for and were awarded an “RTCA” grant from the National Park Service for the purpose of enhancing local trails and greenways. In 2014 the team worked with Teresa Martinez, Director and Co-founder of the Continental Divide Trail Coalition, to designate Silver City as the very first CD Trail Gateway Community.

The group is currently continuing to work on enhancing Silver City’s branding as an outdoor destination, and building more trails in and around town.

Meanwhile, over the past six months the partnering Grant County Trails Group has focused on getting county residents to get out and use our existing trails and walking facilities.

If you enjoy hiking in this area as much as I do, you’ve got to love both of these groups and their impressive accomplishments!

How does someone join the RTCA group to work on development of new trails? Contact Shelby Hallmark at: shelbyhallmark@yahoo.com or 575-519-1426.

How does someone join the Grant County Trails Group? Contact Michele Giese at: Michele.giese@state.nm.us or 538-8573 (x121).

Describe one of your favorite hikes that you’d like to share with the readers:

Name: CD Trail / Silver Spur Loop

Distance: 5 miles

Difficulty: moderate

Directions:

Starting at the intersection of Highway 180 and Alabama St, turn north onto Alabama St. At the .3 mile mark it turns in to Cottage San Rd. At the 3 mile mark, bear left onto Bear Mountain Road. Drive 2.1 miles and make a right onto Forest Road 858. Drive slowly (this road requires high clearance vehicle and patience) for 2.9 miles. Make a left and drive another .8 miles to a cattle guard and park.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Hike Description: This is a loop trail that includes part of the new section of CD Trail and the Silver Spur Trail. Start the loop by crossing over the cattle guard and staying to the left on Forest Road 858. At the 1.0 mile mark you will see an old pumping station. We believe that was attached to Alum Spring and fed water to Silver City at one point. You may see the old water pipe along the way. At the 1.14 mile mark, the new part of the CD Trail crosses the road. Make a hard right onto the CD Trail (if you go to the left on the CDT you will walk around the base of Bear Mountain, if you continue on the road, you will come to a windmill and stock tank). As you climb this ridge, enjoy views of Stewart Peak and Bear Mountain.

Our GPS’s differ here so bear with me. At approximately the 2.50-3.0 mark, you will come to a green gate. Go through the gate, admire the cairn we made, and turn right onto the Silver Spur. Shortly, you will see an old metal Continental Divide Trail sign and walk through a barrier. Look for a cairn to the left and follow the old CD Trail. At approximately the 3.5-4.0 mile mark you will reach a dirt road. Make a right onto the road. Shortly, about .2 miles, the road curves to the right. Look for a cairn and trail on the left. Leave the road and walk the trail for about .5 miles back to your vehicle.

Notes: A great loop trail with diverse landscape. You will experience a few hills, pine groves, and views galore.

I contacted Teresa Martinez, from the Continental Divide Trail Coalition about the changes to the CD Trail. Here’s what she told me, “The Continental Divide Trail Coalition (CDTC) is excited about the development and progress of the new CDT location in and around Silver City. The segments that are complete and open to the public are fantastic trail experiences, and we look forward to acquisition and completion of the final segments of the CDT in the area and when the entire Trail may be opened. CDT is also excited to engage the Silver City Community in the stewardship of the CDT and hopes the efforts in and around Silver City continues to inspire other Trail communities to support the CDT in their communities.”

Where will the new segment of the CDT go? The new trail, which has already been partially completed, crosses over the Burros from its junction with Deadman Canyon Trail north of Burro Peak, past Red Rock Road to Mangus Springs. In the future, the Forest Service will complete the final segment from Mangus Springs across HWY 180 to LS Mesa Road north of Bear Mountain. That portion of the Trail is not complete yet and does cross private property, so the CDTC ask that people not trespass and to only use portions of the Trail that are officially open.

February 2015 – Apache Mountain

Hiking Apache Mountain with Russ Kleinman

A sprained ankle and knee delayed my hike with retired surgeon, Russ Kleinman, but when I finally made it a few weeks later, it was fantastic!

Russ has been enjoying the outdoors since about the age of 4 when he roamed land near his home and later explored the San Gabriel Mountains outside Los Angeles.

Nowadays, he enjoys many outdoor-related activities including shortwave radio operation, dog agility training, hiking, camping and botany. He teaches a plant taxonomy class at WNMU (the science that finds, identifies, describes, classifies, and names plants). Mosses are his current interest, which he demonstrated along the hike by regularly crawling beneath brush and boulders. He wore a magnifying loupe around his neck and showed me the mosses up close. I was surprised to see the different varieties, which looked the same at first, were vastly different when inspected through the magnifier.

If you’re interested in the vegetation of the Gila, a wonderful resource is gilaflora.com, a website by Russ with more than 16,000 photographs, locations and information about the plants in our area.

Describe one of your favorite hikes that you’d like to share with the readers…

Name: Apache Mountain

Distance:
2.6 miles round trip

Difficulty: hard

Directions: Starting at the intersection of highways 180 and 90, drive south on Highway 90 for 30.4 miles (it is just after mile marker 11). Make a left onto WD Ranch Rd. There is a brown forest sign for Forest Road 841 to verify you’re on the right track. The first mile of this road is public access over privately owned land, so please stay on the road and don’t trespass. At the one-mile mark, you will go over a cattle guard and enter National Forest land. When you reach a fork in the road, turn left. Shortly, (a few hundred yards) you will come to a turn-off on the right hand side. Look through the grasses and find a brown forest service marker for Forest Road 40910. Pull in and park (do not block the road).

Hike Description: The first part of this hike is a gradual climb on an old dirt road alongside of Monarch Canyon. At the one-mile mark, you will reach a saddle where you can look down the other side into Apache Canyon. Here is where you leave the road and follow the fence line upward. There is a trail in some spots; when in doubt, I suggest you head upward.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Notes: Don’t try to drive up FR 40910; it is heavily rutted in several spots. This is a short, steep hike up to the top of Apache Mountain. You will climb 1,383 feet up and be rewarded with unbelievable views. On the day we went, we actually looked down at clouds and had one move past us while sitting on the summit.

Along the way, you will see several large boulders and long veins of white quartz, something I’ve not seen often in this abundance in the Gila.

During the hike, Russ told me several hiking adventures, including this story:

“I enjoyed snow camping for a long time and one trip included crossing the Gila River. I knew enough to sleep with my water bottle underneath me in my tent to avoid having ice the next morning. But this trip, I learned another lesson. I took off my cold, wet boots and placed them outside the tent. The next morning, I found them frozen rock solid. A harsh lesson was learned that morning as I hopped barefoot around the snow, looking for dry wood to start a campfire. Thawing my boots was a bit like toasting marshmallows; I didn’t want to put them too close to the fire or they’d burn, and too far away and they’d never thaw.”

After I expressed my aversion to the thought of camping in snow, Russ responded, “Snow camping isn’t for everyone; it leaves a very narrow margin for error.”

Do you have a piece of equipment that you use often when hiking?

Russ shows me his map app called “Backcountry Navigator Pro.” It’s an Android mobile mapping application where you can download different types of maps including topographical, color aerial, street maps and more. You can mark waypoints, record tracks, compute trip pace, utilize a compass, keep waypoint lists, record trip stats, save, export, and import trip notes for future reference and more. I’m not the most technically literate person, but this new stuff is excellent so I guess I’ll get dragged into the tech age, hiking and climbing the entire way!

In order to intrigue you, I’ll share some hearsay about a mystery in the area. Through much digging, and an interesting conversation with local rancher Jimmy Stewart, I learned the following:

The WD in “WD Ranch Road” stands for Will Dover, who was one of about six ranchers who owned property in that area. In the late 1800s/early 1900s he ranched in the Apache Canyon area, including the peak. It is rumored that he got into a dispute with one of the other ranchers and disappeared … never to be heard from again.

 

January 2015 – Fort Bayard Game Reserve

Petroglyph Paradise

Hiking the Dragonfly Trail with Silver City native Jeffrey Carrasco

On a crisp fall morning, I tied up my laces and drove over to Fort Bayard Game Reserve to meet Silver City native, Jeffrey Carrasco. I never fail to learn something when I hike with a new person and my hike with Jeffrey was no different.

During the walk he explained what the small ball-like ‘pods’ were on the scrub oaks we saw (don’t mind this east coaster; I thought it was a seed pod or eggshell of some sort). “Those are galls,” Jeffrey said. “Gall wasps inject fluid into the tree causing the tree cells to multiply and a gall is formed. The wasp larvae grow inside the gall.”

Naturally, I asked Jeffrey to describe one of his favorite hikes, and he picked the Dragonfly Trail.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Name: Dragonfly Trail #720

Distance: various

Difficulty: easy

Directions: Starting at the corner of Highway 180 and 32nd Street Bypass, drive east on Highway 180 for 3.3 miles (between mile marker 118 and 119). Turn north (left) onto Arenas Valley Road and drive one mile straight to the parking lot and trail- head. The last tenth of a mile is dirt road. There are signs on the highway pointing to the turnoff for the Dragonfly Trail.

Hike Description: This is an easier, well-marked walk that offers many hiking options. Here I describe the trail we took to the petroglyphs 1.5 miles away. After parking in the second lot, enter through the green gate and past the information board. You will soon reach a fork. You can reach the dragonfly petroglyphs either way; we went to the right. At the second fork, stay to the right. At the third fork, stay to the left. From this point, brown trail markers clearly guide you right to the petroglyphs. When you see a Forest sign on a tree that says, “Who passed this way?” you’re there. The petroglyphs are among the boulders to your right and up the small hill. Enjoy exploring them but please don’t destroy or compromise the area in any way. Continue past the sign and return to the parking area using the loop trail. Walk about five minutes and you’ll come to a wooden sign that describes a few hiking options. If you go to the right here, you will travel north and meet Sawmill Wagon Road. Hike and explore to your heart’s content.

Notes: The entire area is mostly flat with a few easy hills and sometimes travels near or through Twin Sisters Creek, which may (or may not) contain water.

You will likely encounter other hikers, their dogs and possibly horses and their riders.

The Gila National Forest Service has a map of the trails in this area. They are located on 32nd Street Bypass.

I spoke with Elizabeth Toney of the Forest Service and she shared some information with me about the Dragonfly Petroglyph Site.

“The Dragonfly Petroglyphs at Fort Bayard were formally recognized and recorded as an archaeological site in 2003 through a joint effort by the Grant County Archaeological Society and the Gila National Forest,” she said. “The site is monitored by the New Mexico SiteWatch program. There are at least three dragonfly petroglyphs at that location along with numerous other petroglyphs. There are many different interpretations for what the dragonfly might mean. Some Archeologists have interpreted the dragonfly in Mimbres culture as a symbol of water and fertility. Archaeologists sometimes use ethnographic analogy to also interpret what the dragonfly petroglyph might mean. There are stories that describe the dragonfly as a creature that brought food to people in times of famine. The dragonfly is also thought of as a shamanistic creature that are messenger-type beings sent to open up springs.”


Buildings, days gone by

Jeffrey’s family has been in the Silver City area for generations. I asked him to tell us about the good old days.

As we walked, Jeffrey shares some remembrances and family history. First he describes how Silver City has changed.

“JC Penney was on Bullard Street where Workshops of Carneros was,” he said. “TG&Y (a five-and-dime) was where the Billy Casper Wellness Center now stands. Smith’s Music was on Bullard where Manzanita Ridge is currently. There was a store called “Sprouse-Reitz” (five and dime) where Sun Valley is today. Piggly Wiggly (supermarket) was where Family Dollar (corner of highways180 and 90) is today, and next to that was Anthony’s Clothing. The first Walmart was where Ace Hardware is now. On Highway 180, where the County Administration building now stands was a variety of department stores. Bealls used to be a Kmart.

Then he tells me about his family.

“One grandmother was born in Catron County and another in Cleveland Mine. My mother was born in Santa Rita. In order to visit family in Pinos Altos, they would travel from Santa Rita in a wagon. She told me it took three days.”

Then Jeffrey described some memories of his childhood. He attended the Sixth Street School until, in second grade (circa 1984), someone set it on fire. At that point they went to classes in the library at Jose Barrios until portable classrooms were set up at Harrison Schmitt School. That chain of events caused him to miss out on an experience he had looked forward to as a child.

“Miss Packard was the third grade teacher at Sixth Street School and every year around Christmas she invited her class to her home on Broadway (now “The Inn on Broadway”). I remember my cousins describing how they slid down the banister. Because of that fire, I never was able to do that.”

“You should put that on your bucket list,” I told him.

“I actually was at a meeting at the Inn on Broadway” once,” Jeffrey said with a laugh. “And I was so tempted to do it!”
This is a repost of an article that was originally published in December 2014 in Desert Exposure.

December 2014 – Boston Hill

A Town of Trails

Hiking Boston Hill in Silver City with Adrienne Booth.

by Linda Ferrara

To wind up the 2014 hiking articles, I was lucky enough to hike with Adrienne Booth, a vivacious woman who is involved with many organizations in Silver City including: Grant County Trails Group, Tamal Fiesta y Mas, SWNM Green Chamber of Commerce, and the Grant County branch of AAUW-Expanding Your Horizons. I felt an immediate connection with her since we both grew up in urban areas (she in Illinois and me just outside Newark, NJ) and at early ages found connections to the outdoors.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

Her first outdoor experiences were exploring the urban neighborhoods and public parks around her childhood home on the South Side of Chicago. As she spent more and more time outside, she came to love nature, and when she visited a new place her first inquiry was about hiking in the vicinity. “Being outside was fun, inexpensive entertainment,” she recalled. “In college, I didn’t own a car, and I explored much of urban and rural New England on foot.”

One of the many things that drew her to the Silver City area was the potential for hiking. She told me, “This is the best urban trail system I’ve seen, including places with highly praised greenways such as Austin, Texas, and Portland, Oregon. As a community, we need to appreciate and use this special opportunity.”

Adrienne earned a degree in Visual and Environmental Studies from Harvard in 1980, and later did graduate work in geography and interpretive media. She has worked for educational publishers, coordinated manager training programs for Texas State Parks, and recently served as manager for the Gila Conservation Education Center here in Silver City. One of her current interests is with the Grant County Trails Group in our area. This group, along with many other organizations, helps create and promote a system of greenways in and near Silver City to provide local residents with places to enjoy nature and get exercise.

On many local trails you will get a flavor for the past and how Silver City developed into the unique place it is today. Maybe we should call this hike the “Health, History and Heritage Tour.” When she hikes regularly, Adrienne finds that she feels better. By walking just half an hour daily, she has seen her bad cholesterol numbers go down and her lipid numbers get in check. Her glucose numbers have gotten under control, she sleeps better and doesn’t crave junk food, her clothes fit better and the 56-year-old feels mentally sharper.

Both Adrienne and I want to encourage readers to get out and explore these trails. Instead of sitting and having coffee with a friend, why not get a to-go cup and walk one of the trails? Rather than playing video games, why not bring the kids to the trails and show them one of the many paths in the area? Are you thinking of a New Year’s resolution for 2015? Consider making this yours: “I’m going to get out and hike all of these trails in 2015.”

Here is a partial list of some the trails currently available right in the Silver City area: Boston Hill, Big Ditch Park, La Capilla Vista, San Vicente Creek, Big Tree Trail, Dragonfly Trail, Gomez Peak Trail System. You can get a more extensive list at here.

Name: Boston Hill

Distance: various

Difficulty: easy to moderate

Directions: There are several trailheads in the Boston Hill trail system. One entrance is at the top of Market Street, near Hwy. 180. The others are on Cheyenne Street (off Market), Spring Street (off Cooper) and Cooper Street (north of the cemetery).

Hike description: This is a pleasant, meandering trail system over the 550 acres of Boston Hill. You will enjoy long-range, panoramic views of the area, various mine evidence to explore, and wildlife and plants of the area. Since it is a series of three hills, there is some climbing. But it’s still easy and doable for most people.

Notes: In 1879 a mining claim was made on the smallest of the hills by the “Boston Company.” Within four years they had sold the mine, but the name remained. In 1999 the Town of Silver City purchased the property with intentions of preserving it as open space.

It is popular with locals because it allows dogs on leashes, is open to bicyclists and pedestrian traffic, and is close to town yet still provides the feel of nature. There are benches for resting and numbered trail junction signs. If you’re going in hot weather, bring water and wear a hat. If you would like to have a map to take with you, you can get one at the Visitor’s Center on Hudson Street, or online here.

Tell us about a particularly memorable hiking experience:

“In both 2013 and 2014, I worked with the Hispanic Access Foundation to bring about 30 urban kids from Catholic youth groups to experience the Gila River for the first time. We hiked near the Cliff Dwellings and in the Mogollon Box area.

“For many participants, it was a spiritual and life-changing experience. They turned off cell phones except to take photographs of the river to share with their friends, and they talked about wanting to come back on their own to explore the outdoors again. It was very rewarding for me to share my love of nature with them and to have them enjoy it and want to share it with others.”

 

This is a reprint of an article that first appeared in the December 2014 issue of Desert Exposure.