Category Archives: Search and Rescue

May 2016 – San Francisco Hot Springs

Pamela Morgan and I met when I was a Realtor and I helped her find a home. We’ve hiked many times before so when she contacted me recently, I was happy to get back on a trail with her.   Catching up with Pamela included hearing about her three week trip to Thailand and riding an elephant, comparing notes on elderly parents, hearing about her new venture offering Stress Management (more on that later), and her K9 work with Grant County Search and Rescue (GCSAR).

The whole day was full of interesting conversation but the K9 training had me especially fascinated. Trained dogs aid searches by helping to determine the direction of travel of the lost subject which narrows the search field dramatically. The GCSAR K9 unit currently has four handlers and 6 dogs that train weekly. While on our hike, we tested Pamela’s dog, Riley. I walked ahead for several minutes and hid. I watched through the bushes as he came off the main trail at the exact point where I did, went directly to the first bush I stopped behind and then continued quickly to my hiding spot. We performed this exercise twice in two different areas and he easily found me both times. It was amazing to watch.

As hikers, we’ve all heard stories about searches. If you get in a jam, it’s a relief to know that our area has a search team that’s well trained and willing to help. They are currently looking for members so if you have a desire to help others, like to play with gadgets, want to see some beautiful country, want to meet and work with great people, then GCSAR is something to consider joining.

Pamela told me about some of the trainings which sounded pretty cool. The topics include: navigation, virtual battleship, night training, lost person behavior, wildlife dangers, survival training, tech tool training, and lots more.

If you’re interested in joining, visit: http://www.gcsar-nm.org/join.htm, or come to their next meeting on June 16at 6:30 at the Gila Regional Medical Center’s EMS building on 32nd Street.

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Here is an interesting hike to consider:

Name:  San Francisco Hot Springs

Distance: Variable

Difficulty: Moderate

Directions: Drive 180 north until you are between mile marker 57 and 56. Turn left onto County Road 025. Take this a short distance until you see the trailhead. There is a bathroom and Forest Service Information Board at the trailhead.

Hike Description: This trail is hilly until you reach the canyon area. Take the steep trail to the bottom of the canyon. From there, go to the left either by crossing the river and bushwhacking to the left or, before crossing the river, find the trail on your left and take that. Walk for 5-10 minutes. The hot springs are on the far side of the river, right against the river bank. With a little searching, we found them. Please note: your feet will get wet. Prepare accordingly.

Interesting geology surrounds hot springs. The water is heated by molten rock and raises to the surface through cracks. The warm water allows algae and bacteria to thrive. I was tickled that I could simultaneously put one hand in the cold river and the other in a warm spring.

Tell me about your new venture: Along our walk, Pamela told me about her new business, “Willowleaf Stress Management” that helps people manage the stress in their lives. In the coming months she will be growing her business and sharing her knowledge with the public. If you’d like to talk to her about this service, check out her website at: http://www.willowleafsm.com/ or contact her at 534-1395.

June 2015 – FR880 – Sheep Corral Canyon Rd.

There are many ways to enjoy the outdoors in our area, and for the treasure hunter in all of us, geocaching is a fun option.

At the basic level, Geocaching is an activity where items (sometimes a log book, sometimes a small toy) are hidden by one party, logged onto the website, and then can be found by other parties. Anyone who has delighted in finding Easter eggs in the backyard will enjoy this game.

This month, the hike involves finding 5 caches along the route. You can either go to the website and get the information (Serina and Chad have put in clever descriptions and clues), or you can follow my directions in the hike description below.

 

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To get started, go to the website (www.geocaching.com/map ) and move the map so you can see north of Signal Peak and Scott Peak. Near the label called, “Slack Sawmill Tank”, you will see five caches. These are the items you’ll be trying to find on your hike. Click on the first cache, “H” Marks the Spot” and when the information window opens, click on the title (“H” Marks the Spot) and read the description for clues of where the cache is hidden. You can either write the clues down or use a GPS to find the items. Click on the other caches and note the clues. There is an app that can be downloaded onto your Smartphone, but be careful, there’s no connection in the remote areas.

Geocache Hike Description:

Name: Forest Road 880 – Sheep Corral Canyon Road

Distance: 2.0 roundtrip (or more…….)

Difficulty: easy to moderate

Directions: Starting at the intersection of Highway 15 and 32nd Street, drive 15.9 miles north on Highway 15 (a.k.a Pinos Altos Rd., a.k.a. P.A. Rd.). On the left is Sheep Corral Canyon Rd. There is a brown highway sign to show you where it is. Drive up this dirt road. At the 1.1 mile mark, pull over and park.

Hike Description: There is an old dirt road leading up hill. The brown Forest Road sign (882) was lying on the ground when we were there. Head up the hill. After walking 0.2 miles you will come to Forest Road 880. Don’t take the first side road, walk to the top of the hill and see a second road. Follow this road a short distance to the first cache. Here is the clue to find the cache: Go to the southwest side of where “H” marks the spot and walk 120 feet in a southwest direction where you will find a large pile of rocks and boulders. You are looking for a container with a log and a few toys in it. It is customary that if you take an item, you also leave an item, so you might consider bringing a toy or similar type object (but you don’t have to).Write your information in the log and return the container to its original hiding spot.

Go back the way you came and continue on the main road for a minute or so. Look on your right for cache #2. Here’s your clue: “A step above”. You will find a container hidden near the clue.

Now continue towards cache #3. At the .6 mile mark, your clue is: “Gila Hallow”. Before heading down the hill, look on your right for a hallow tree trunk. If you look carefully, you will find your next treasure.

You will now continue downhill (careful, there’s a lot of loose rock here) and at the .77 mile mark, your clue for cache #4 is “Rooty” (on the left). When you find this nice sized green box, why not take a photograph to share on the geocaching website later?

And now continue downhill to the .9 mile mark and find your last cache. The clue is “Y”. Here, on the left, you find the tree in question. To find the cache, follow a downed tree trunk to the fortune.

You have now found all the caches for this hike. But I encourage you to continue on the old road for a beautiful hike through the pines.

After the hike, go to the website and log your “finds”. You can also add photos showing you and your friends at the location.

Notes: (1) Please do not remove caches. (2) To learn more about this game (I only scratched the surface here), you can go to the website and read “Geocaching 101”.

About my guides: During our time hiking, I learned more about my Geocache guides. Since winning the Girl Scout Gold Award and meeting President Obama for her work in literacy (www.readforjoy.org), Serina has kept herself busy. She is currently on the Executive Board of the Girl Scouts of the Desert Southwest, has Served as Post-Secondary National President and member of Business Professionals of America, just ended two terms as Lieutenant Governor of Southwest District of Circle K International, is going to college at WNMU, is a world champion horsewoman and still has time to hide and find geocaches!

“Chad Paavola is equally impressive. He served 8 years in the Army, spending 5 years in Germany and was also stationed in Fort Myer, Virginia. He loves to travel the world and even scuba dives. He currently teaches at the Law Enforcement Academy at WNMU and is pursuing his masters degree in Elementary Education. This couple enjoys geocaching so much that when they’re on vacation, they fit geocaching into their travels. What a fun way to explore the world!

This article first appeared in the June 25, 2015 “The Independent” in my column, “Trail Mix”.  http://silvercitydailypress.nm.newsmemory.com/

March 2014 – Table Mountain Trail – City of Rocks

Now don’t be jealous, fellow trekkers, but this lucky hiker got to spend a sunny winter day with Marc Levesque hiking a stellar trail, hearing stories about adventures in Maine, New Hampshire and Antarctica, and listening to firsthand accounts of local area search and rescue missions.

Marc and his wife, Susan Porter, have been exploring the trails in this area since they moved here in 2005, and have been avid hikers for over 40 years, mostly in the mountains of northern New England. Marc was a member of the Appalachian Mountain Club, where he was involved in winter ascents, rock climbing, leading hikes and directing the AMC Mountain Leadership School in 1979-1980. Here in Silver City, he is a battalion chief with the Pinos Altos Volunteer Fire Rescue, teaches “Fundamentals of Search and Rescue” at WNMU’s Outdoor Program, and is president of Grant County Search and Rescue. Was I a little intimidated hiking with the president of Search and Rescue? Sure was. Did I have a ball hiking with him? You bet I did!

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He suggested we hike a newly created trail that he described as “a gem.”

Name: Table Mountain Trail, City of Rocks State Park
Distance: 2.0-6.0 miles
Difficulty: 70% easy, 20% medium, 10% difficult

Directions: Starting from the intersection of 32nd Street By-Pass and Hwy. 180 in Silver City, drive 24.8 miles southeast on Hwy. 180 until you reach Hwy. 61. Turn left onto Hwy. 61 and drive 3.0 miles to the entrance of City of Rocks State Park.

Hike description: I suggest you stop into the Visitors’ Center and check out the history and geology of this wonderful park. Be sure to chat with park volunteers, who are extremely knowledgeable, helpful and pleasant. They have a map of the park that will assist you. Here is more info about the park for those of you who want to do some homework before you go: www.emnrd.state.nm.us/SPD/cityofrocksstatepark.html.

For a shorter hike, park in the northeast corner of the park near the Pegasus Campground. Walk 0.22 miles on the trail that heads east. Turn right (south) onto Hydra Trail and then turn left (east) onto the trail that takes you up to Table Top Mountain.

For a longer hike, park at the Visitors’ Center Parking lot and take the Hydra Walking Trail for 1.0 mile. Turn right (east) onto the trail that heads up to Table Top Mountain.

When you go through the gate, the trail starts the ascent uphill toward the first bench of the mountain. It gets steeper still until you finally reach the top. Look down and see the 557 feet you just climbed. Now walk around the mesa top, have fun boulder jumping, and enjoy the scenery. Return the way you came.

 

City Of Rocks Map

 

Notes: This is a newer trail that volunteer Tim Davis has been working on for the past few years. We met Tim on the trail; perhaps you will, too! City of Rocks State Park requires an entrance fee of $5 per car. Gates are open from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Why not bring a lunch and spend the day? Enjoy this trail in the morning, check out the rocks in the early afternoon, and then head over to Faywood Hot Springs for a soak to end the day just right! Or bring camping gear and explore for several days.

Tell us about a particularly memorable hiking experience:

“I was 34 years old and had just returned from a contract job at South Pole Station in Antarctica, where we had set a temperature record during the year I was there of minus-117 degrees,” says Levesque. “I had lost 22 pounds during that time and had virtually no body fat. Upon returning, I decided to get out and enjoy the White Mountains of New Hampshire on a solo day hike in 20-degree February weather. My body had not adjusted to the loss of body fat, and when I reached a spot just below the summit, I realized I was deeply shivering. I knew this was the first stage of hypothermia and probably should have turned back. But sometimes one’s testosterone level exceeds one’s intelligence quotient, so I just stopped, ate something, put on all the clothes I had with me, and continued on towards the summit.

“It all turned out okay, but between the clouds, the wind, the deep snow and the temperature, I could have easily found myself in serious trouble.” The rescuer in him comes out as he adds, “It’s really not a great idea to hike alone in such winter conditions.”

In closing, Levesque has a final comment: “Always let someone know where you’re going on a hike. It will make it much easier for us to find you if you get lost or injured.”

For more information about Grant County Search and Rescue, go to: gcsar-nm.org.

 

This is a repost of an article that originally appeared in Desert Exposure.

Check them out at: http://www.desertexposure.com/100hikes/